Teaching Lectures (Videos)

“Gilman and de Beauvoir: the ‘Other’ Sex and Feminist Gothic”

Arts One Lecture, University of British Columbia (100 students)

This lecture begins by discussing the various “waves” of feminism in the western world, and then discusses how woman has become the “other,” according to Simone de Beauvoir in her book The Second Sex (1949). It then gives some background on S. Weir Mitchell, the doctor who treated Charlotte Perkins Gilman (and whom she mentions in her short story “The Yellow Wall-Paper”), and Mitchell’s approach to treating neurasthenia. The lecture also discusses various styles of narration and how we might think about the narrator in Gilman’s story. It ends by explaining how we can see elements of the “feminist Gothic” in “The Yellow Wall-Paper.”

Note: click on the lecture title for full video and visual slides on the UBC website, in addition to the YouTube video below. For more study materials related to this lecture, go to the website.


“Decadence and Disturbance in 1970s Film-making: Coppola’s Apocalypse Now (1979)”

Arts One Lecture, University of British Columbia (100 students)

This lecture talks about the degree to which Francis Ford Coppola’s film Apocalypse Now (1979) revisits Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness (1899) and deviates from it (the students had just read Conrad’s novella and heard a lecture about it already), the style of “New Wave” American 1970s film-making that this film could be said to fit into, the historical and cultural context of the film, and cultural and literary references in the film.

Note that the videorecording was set to automatically stop at a certain time, and so the lecture was cut off at the end. Also, some clips were shown from the film which, due to copyright, couldn’t be recorded and shown on a public website, so those parts have been cut out of the videorecording.

Note: Click on the lecture title for full video and visual slides on the UBC website, in addition to the YouTube video above. For more study materials related to this lecture, go to the website.

 

Here’s another link to this same lecture (with slides), given on Jan. 11, 2016 as a guest lecturer. This other version is a bit longer and not cut off at the end.

 


 

“Arthur Miller’s The Crucible: Political Allegory and Social Tragedy”

Arts One Lecture, University of British Columbia (100 students)

Following a lecture by Robert Crawford about the historical background to the play in the form of a discussion of the cold war, the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC), and Joseph McCarthy, Derek Gladwin talks about the literary elements of the play, particularly by explaining allegory and tragedy, and then discusses how we might or might not view John Proctor as a tragic hero.

Note: Two lectures are on this videorecording, so please forward to minute 56 for Derek’s lecture in both the YouTube and Arts One sites. Click on the lecture title for full video and visual slides on the UBC website, in addition to the YouTube video available below. For more study materials related to this lecture, go to the website.